IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary was generated at The Wire IndyWatch.

Sunday, 04 November

05:18

Announcing Ecologise.in "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Peakoilindia.org has been discontinued. Visit our new website, www.ecologise.in.
masthead

 

 

 

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Wednesday, 31 October

18:39

News update "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

5 reasons why Tibets melting ice is a disaster for India, Europe and US
Nihar Gokhale, Catch News
Did you know that rivers originating in Tibets glaciers supply water to 1.3 billion people? Thats equivalent to the entire population of India. But these glaciers are fast disappearing due to global warming. Tibets sustainability is crucial for sustenance of the world, but this fact is not commonly known. The glaciers are just the tip of the iceberg.

The Gulf will soon be too hot for human beings literally
Scroll.in
A study by Jeremy S Pal and Elfatih AB Eltahir of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology finds that human beings will not be able to survive in the Gulf just 65 years from now. Our results expose a specific regional hot spot where climate change, in the absence of significant mitigation, is likely to severely impact human habitability in the future, the study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, said.

World set to use more energy for cooling than heating
The Guardian UK
The world faces a looming and potentially calamitous cold crunch, with demand for air conditioning and refrigeration growing so fast that it threatens to smash pledges and targets for global warming. Worldwide power consumption for air conditioning alone is forecast to surge 33-fold by 2100 as developing world incomes rise and urbanisation advances. Already, the US uses as much electricity to keep buildings cool as the whole of Africa uses on everything; China and India are fast catching up. By mid-century people will use more energy for cooling than heating (Also read: How America became addicted to air conditioning).

The Rapid and Startling Decline Of Worlds Vast Boreal Forests
Jim Robbins, Yale Environment 360
Scientists are becoming increasingly concerned about the fate of the huge boreal forest that spans from Scandinavia to northern Canada. Unprecedented warming in the region is jeopardizing the future of a critical ecosystem that makes up nearly a third of the earths forest cover...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Sunday, 28 October

11:18

Call for Papers: Indian Society for Ecological Economics "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 8th Biennial Conference of the Indian Society for Ecological Economics (INSEE)

On

URBANIZATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Hosted by

Department of Management Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

During

4 6 January 2016

Rapid urbanization and industrialization-led economic growth are the quintessential features of developing country landscapes, particularly in South Asia. Urbanization brings about dramatic changes in local environments, occupying land and water bodies, creating air pollution and heat island effects. It places demands on regional resources such as water and agriculture. Urban areas and industry dump their solid waste and effluents onto peri-urban areas, remote islands or deep beneath the oceans. The growth of industry, which promises and at times provides more jobs, legitimizes this demand for resources, the creation of new slums and gentrified spaces, different gender relationships, lifestyle changes and health impacts. Urban lifestyles also set the benchmark to which others aspire, and therefore the ecological footprint they will generate.

INSEE, an association of professionals interested in issues at the interface of ecology, economy, and society, invites submissions of original papers and panels of papers addressing these concerns at its 8th Biennial Conference, which focuses onUrbanization and the Environment.

Analyses of gaps in current challenges as well as of possible ways towards more sustainable and equitable urbanization are welcome. Contributions from different interdisciplinary perspectives (e.g., ecological and environmental economics, geography, political ecology, gender-environment studies, environmental governance, ecology, water and wastewater management, energy studies) are invited. Scholars include academics, students, environmental and social activists, policy-makers, entrepreneurs and bureaucrats: anyone engaged in rigorously exploring questions, conducting analysis and deriving lessons on these issues.

The Conference will be held at the Indian Institute of Science in the city of Bengalurubetween 16th-18th December 2018. Bengaluru, once known as Indias garden city, is one of the worlds most rapidly expanding metropolises, and a microcosm of the socio-environmental challenges and responses that urbanization and industrial...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Friday, 26 October

11:04

Credit Suisse: Richest 1% own 53% of Indias wealth "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

According to Credit Suisse, Indias wealth increased by $2.284 trillion between 2000 and 2018. Of this rise, the richest 1% has hogged 61%

Manas Chakravarty, Live Mint Graphic by Prajakta Patil/Mint

The richest 1% of Indians own 53% of the countrys wealth, according to the latest data on global wealth from Credit Suisse. The richest 5% own 68.6% of the countrys wealth, while the top 10% have 76.3%. At the other end of the pyramid, the poorer half of our countrymen jostles for 4.1% of the nations wealth. As Deng Xiaoping put it so pithily, It is glorious to be rich.

Whats more, things are getting more and more glorious for the rich. Data from Credit Suisse show that Indias richest 1% owned just 36.8% of the countrys wealth in 2000, while the share of the top 10% was 65.9%. Since then the richest have managed to steadily increase their share of the pie, as the chart shows. This happened during the years of the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government from 2000-04, during the first United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government backed by the Left, during the second UPA tenure and now in the first year of the Modi government; the share of the top 1% has now crossed 50%. The colour of the government has been no impediment to the steady rise in the riches of the wealthy.

The chart shows that the difference between the share of the top 1% and that of the top 10% was 29.1 percentage points in 2000, but is down to 23.3 percentage points in 2018. In other words, the top 1% is eating into the share of the next 9%. The richest are growing at the expense of the relatively well-off. Between 2010 and 2018, the share of the poorer half of the population shrank from 5.3% to 4.1%.

According to Credit Suisse, Indias wealth increased by $2.284 trillion between 2000 and 2018. Of this rise, the richest 1% has hogged 61%, while the top 10% bagged 81%. The other 90% got the leftovers.

The share of Indias richest 1% is far ahead than that of top 1% of the US, who own a mere 37.3% of the total US wealth. But Indias finest still have a long way to go before they match Russia, where the top 1% own a stupendous 70.3% of the countrys wealth.

View original article
Download Credit Suisse Global Wealth Databook 2018 

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Wednesday, 24 October

11:12

Sagar Dhara: The climate challenge is deeper than technology "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

DEVELOPMENT AND DISARMAMENT ROUNDTABLE

logo

Technologys role in a climate solution
If the world is to avoid severe, widespread, and irreversible [climate] impacts, carbon emissions must decrease quicklyand achieving such cuts, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, depends in part on the availability of key technologies. But arguments abound against faith in technological solutions to the climate problem. Electricity grids may be ill equipped to accommodate renewable energy produced on a massive scale. Many technological innovations touted in the past have failed to achieve practical success. Even successful technologies will do little good if they mature too late to help avert climate disaster. Below, experts from India, the United States, and Bangladesh address the following questions: To what extent can the world depend on technological innovation to address climate change? And what promising technologiesin generating, storing, and saving energy, and in storing greenhouse gases or removing them from the atmosphereshow most potential to help the world come to terms with global warming?

The challenge is deeper than technology

Sagar Dhara

Human beings habitually prioritize their own right to nature over other species rights to it; energy growth has depended on this habit.  It has also depended on private ownership of nature, which allows an investorindividual, enterprise, stateto make small energy investments that deliver large amounts of surplus energy. Surplus energy spurs human development and lifestyle changes, and the desire for development drives further energy growth.

Fossil fuels, with their high energy density, have played a major role in the human growth story. In 2012, the most recent year for which International Energy Agency figures are available, fossil fuels provided 82 percent of the worlds primary e...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Tuesday, 23 October

11:28

E-book: Water warriors Stories on people and their relationship with water "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

The stories in this yearbook highlight efforts by rural and urban communities across India to take back ownership of their water resources.

India Water Portal

Prayers on the bank of the Kshipra

Prayers on the bank of the Kshipra

Water sustains lives and livelihoods. It is a precious and finite resource that, in future years, is likely to become the main bone of contention between peoples, states and nations. Water like every other finite resource needs sustainable and equitable management, with equal focus on reducing demand, recycling and finding alternatives, as well as the usual emphasis on supply solutions.

While alarms are regularly raised over its increasing scarcity, water is largely seen as a matter of state regulation and governance, and is affected by large-scale issues such as privatisation, industrial and human pollution, and corruption.

Water warriors Stories on people and their relationship with water presents the issue of water from the perspective of local communities, based on the premise that water is a very local issue that affects the lives of people everywhere, every day. The stories in this yearbook highlight efforts by rural and urban communities across India in as far off regions as Umananda island in Assam, Amatikra in Chhattisgarh, Bengaluru in Karnataka, and Dhanukshkodi in Tamil Nadu to take back ownership of their water resources.

These stories first appeared on the India Water Portal in English, Hindi and Kannada. This book showcases the best content from the Portal since its inception.

...

...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Monday, 22 October

15:06

Series: INDCs and the road to Paris 1 "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

(Note: Indias Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), its eagerly awaited promise of action to counter climate change ahead of the Paris climate talks this year, was released earlier this month. Starting with this one, we present a series of posts that look at whether Indias pledge is all its claimed to be. In this post, we present some of the initial coverage of the pledge that summarises its contents and a guide to understanding the importance of INDCs, apart from Indias INDC document itself)

Full text of Indias INDC

A concise summary of Indias INDCs: India Announces New Climate Targets

A primer on INDCs and what they imply, read: Adding up INDCs: what country commitments could mean for climate change

ANALYSES

Indias INDC is fair, and its renewable energy and forestry targets are ambitious, says CSE
CSE India
Indias INDC reflects its development challenges, aspirations and the realities of climate change. Indias renewable energy target is more ambitious than that of the US. Indias emission intensity target is exactly similar to that of Chinas. About 85 per cent of countries have submitted their INDCs. Their collective pledges are not in line with keeping the world within the safe 2C temperature rise target.

 5 Key Takeaways from Indias New Climate Plan
World Resources Institute
As the worlds third-largest emitter and a country thats highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, it is encouraging to witness India invest in actions to tackle climate change while addressing critical issues such as poverty, food security and access to healthcare and education.

Indias climate pledge: keeping promises will be a tall order
Nihar Gokhale, Catch News
While it is true that much of the climate action plan depends on getting money and technology fro...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Sunday, 21 October

04:34

News update "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Capitalism is Mother Earths Cancer: World Peoples Summit Issues 12 Demands
Common Dreams
Decrying capitalism as a threat to life, an estimated 7,000 environmentalists, farmers, and Indigenous activists from 40 countries convened in the Bolivian town of Tiquipaya for this weekends World Peoples Conference on Climate Change, aiming to elevate the demands of social movements and developing countries in the lead-up to upcoming United Nations-led climate talks. Capitalism is Mother Earths cancer, Bolivian President Evo Morales told the crowd, which also heard over the course of the three-day conference from United Nations Secretary-General Ban ki-Moon as well as other Latin American leaders.

Why Earths future will depend on how we build our cities
Chris Mooney, The Washington Post
It may be the most important number on Earth: 1,000 gigatons. Thats roughly how much carbon dioxide humanity has left to emit, scientists say, in order to have a two-thirds chance of keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius above the temperature in pre-industrial times and thus, staying within what has often been deemed a safe climate threshold. A new report, though, finds that if we dont build cities more wisely, using much greener infrastructure, then they could be a crucial factor that tips the planet over the 1,000 gigaton line and indeed, that they could play this role in just five years time.

Europes greenhouse gas emissions fall to record low
The Guardian UK
Greenhouse gas emissions in Europe have plunged to the lowest level ever recorded after the EUs member states reported an estimated 23% drop in emissions between 1990 and 2014. The bloc has now overshot its target for 2020 of cutting emissions by one-fifth at the same time that its economy grew by 46%, according to the EUs climate chief, Miguel Arias Canete .

Integrated Energy Policy Formulated To Boost The Energy Sector
Mondaq.com
In order to provide a collective policy covering all sources of energy including renewable energy sources, the Government of India has formulated an Integrated Energy Policy. The said policy outlines a roadmap to develop energy supply...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Friday, 19 October

19:03

Workshop: Introduction to Permaculture and Forest Farming, Bangalore, Oct 28-30 "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Permaculture Patashala

When: 28-30th (Wed-Fri) Oct 2018

Where: Bhoomi Campus (Sarjapur Road) & Bhoomi Gurukul Farm, Bengaluru.
Instructor: Shri. Narsanna Koppula, Aranya Agricultural Alternatives, Telangana.
Course Fees: INR 3000 to be paid to Bhoomi College.
To register: Drop a mail to naveenvedu@gmail.com OR call at +91-9449051027 (limited seats).

Course Details:
During the workshop, Shri Narsanna will elaborate on the concepts and practices of permaculture at the Bhoomi campus (Sarjapur Road). He will also accompany participants on a field trip to understand water conservation and other practices at the Bhoomi Gurukul farm, located on the outskirts of Bengaluru.

About Shri. Narsanna Koppula:
Narsanna Koppula is a Permaculture pioneer in India, campaigner of permaculture practices all over the world, nature lover, environmentalist and humanitarian working for cause of empowerment of rural communities. Forest being his first love, believes forest is the future and he spreads his message through his child Aranya Agricultural alternatives a nonprofit organization operational presently in tribal areas of Adilabad, also in backward areas of Zaheerabad, in Telangana, India. While working with grassroots level communities since almost three decades, he is committed to the vision of achieving Ecological and sustainable Agricultural Livelihoods through Permaculture, and Subsistence farming practices for healthy and non exploitative society. Watch: Video interview with Narsanna Koppula

About Aranya
:

Since 1999, Aranya has been empowering farming communities across Telangana and Andhra Pradesh with Permaculture practices that create sustainable agricultural livelihoods. We have facilit...

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Thursday, 18 October

11:10

National Geographic Special Issue on Climate Change "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Fresh Hope for Combating Climate Change (Introductory article)

If a climate disaster is to be averted, well have to move forward without relying as much on fossil fuels. It can be done.

Robert Kunzig, National Geographic

01-intro-2048THIS YEAR COULD BE THE TURNING POINT. Laurence Tubiana thinks so. Shes a small, elegant, white-haired woman of 63. At a press briefing in a noisy restaurant near Washingtons Capitol Hill, she apologized for being incapable of raising her voicewhich in a diplomat is no doubt an excellent quality. Tubiana is no ordinary diplomat: Shes Frances climate ambassador, charged with the greatest cat-herding project in history. For the past year and a half she has been traveling the world, meeting with negotiators from 195 countries, trying to ensure that the global climate confab in Paris this December will be a successa watershed in the struggle against climate change. This notion of a turning pointthats super important, Tubiana says.

There are at least 20 reasons to fear she will fail. Since 1992, when the worlds nations agreed at Rio de Janeiro to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, theyve met 20 times without moving the needle on carbon emissions. In that interval weve added almost as much carbon to the atmosphere as we did in the previous century. Last year and the past decade were the warmest since temperature records began. Record-breaking heat waves are now five times as likely as they once were. A large part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists reported last year, is doomed to collapsemeaning that in the coming centuries sea level will rise at least four feet and probably much more. Were already redrawing the map of the planet, especially of the zones where animals, plants, and people can live.

And yet theres also an unmistakable trace of hope in the air. A lot of it is still just talk. China and the United States, the two largest carbon emitters, have announced a deal to reduce emissions. Six European oil companies say theyd welcome a carbon tax. A giant Norwegian pension fund has pledged to stop investing in coal. And the pope has brought his immense spiritual authority to bear on the problem.

But the reasons for hope go beyond promises and declarations. In 2014 global...

Friday, 20 July

01:56

The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: July 11 - 18, 2018 "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

New activity/unrest was reported for 7 volcanoes between July 11 and 18, 2018. During the same period, ongoing activity was reported for 13 volcanoes. New activity/unrest: Ibu, Halmahera (Indonesia) | Krakatau, Indonesia | Nevados de Chillan, Chile | Oraefajokull,...... Read more

Historic wildfire outbreak hits Sweden amid record-breaking heat "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Scandinavia is experiencing exceptionally warm temperatures, over 11 C (20 F) above average, for more than a month. Above-average temperatures combined with drought, lightning, and human negligence to cause what Swedish authorities are describing as the...... Read more

Indias pre-election changes to green laws draw criticism "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

With Indias general elections looming large next year, the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi has proposed sweeping overhauls of environmental laws that govern the countrys forests, fragile coasts, wildlife, and tackle air pollution. Once the proposed changes are finalized they will become the cornerstone for Indias environmental policy for at least the next two decades. However, environmentalists say the changes seem to have been proposed in quick succession to avoid wider and detailed consultations with all concerned stakeholders, and to speed up the process of finalization. They also allege that the proposed changes to existing environmental laws are not focused on protecting and conserving the environment, but aim to ease the growth of industries a promise made by Prime Minister Modi just before the 2014 general elections. Tinkering with the countrys green laws is not new for the current government. Since coming to power in May 2014, it has implemented a series of changes related to environmental law. However, it has not yet been able to initiate any big-ticket plans. With the general elections now scheduled to take place in the first the half of 2019, the government has hit the gas to implement large-scale changes. Deforestation in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Image by Saurabhsawantphoto via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0). Changes to environmental policies In October 2017, the Indian government finalized the third National Wildlife Action Plan (2017-31) of India. This action plan, along with three other proposed action plans concerning forests, coasts and air pollution, will together

Cross-border camera trap research puts wild Amur leopard number at 84 "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

An international team of scientists has used camera traps in China and Russia to come up with a more accurate estimate of Amur leopards in the wild. The research, published in the journal Conservation Letters on June 19, used photographs from the traps to identify individual leopards that live in the borderlands between the two countries. Scientists recognize this area as likely the last place on Earth where this critically endangered leopard subspecies (Panthera pardus orientalis) lives. That fact makes collaborations of this type, which included biologists from Chinese, Russian and U.S. institutions, critical to learning more about an elusive animal. This first rigorous estimate of the global population of the Amur leopard represents an excellent example of the value of international collaboration, Dale Miquelle, who coordinates the Wildlife Conservation Societys tiger program and was a co-author of the study, said in a statement. Twenty percent of the leopards counted in the study moved across the border between China and Russia. Image by Julie Larsen Maher/WCS. Previous surveys of the Amur leopard used their tracks in the snow, which made it difficult to pick out individual cats. The camera trap photographs used in this study allowed the team to pick out individuals by the patterns of their spots. The work revealed that 20 percent of the leopard population turned up on both of sides of the border. We knew that leopards moved across the border, co-lead author and biologist Anya Vitkalova, of Russias Land of the Leopard National Park, said in

First fern genomes sequenced and they hold a lot of promise "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

For the first time ever, biologists have sequenced the genomes of two tiny ferns, Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata, and theyve revealed some interesting secrets. Despite being one of the most diverse groups of plants on the planet, ferns were the only major plant group to not have their genomes sequenced until now. This however is not due to lack of interest, but the fact that fern genomes tend to be humongous, Fay-Wei Li, a plant biologist at the Boyce Thompson Institute and Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, told Mongabay in an email. Ferns can have as many as 720 pairs of chromosomes and genomes as big as 148 billion base pairs of DNA sequences (Gb). By contrast, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the first plant to have its genome sequenced, has only five pairs of chromosomes and a genome size of 0.135 Gb. (For comparison, the human genome has around 3 billion base pairs). Li and his team, however, found that both Azolla and its sister genus, Salvinia, have extremely small genomes  A. filiculoides is 0.75 Gb while S. cucullata is 0.26 Gb  making them good candidates for genome sequencing. We were excited about this result, and an international consortium was assembled to sequence these two ferns, Li said. Salvinia cucullata, or Asian watermoss. Image by Ziegler175 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0). But there was a problem. Getting funding for the genome project wasnt easy, and all their letters of intent were declined, Li said. So the researchers tried to get some funding

00:57

free printable perfect attendance certificate template "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

free printable perfect attendance certificate template

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary was generated at The Wire IndyWatch.

Resource generated at IndyWatch using aliasfeed and rawdog