IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary was generated at The Wire IndyWatch.

Thursday, 24 May

09:00

Ella George: Purges and Paranoia "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

When military juntas imposed martial law at least there was always the hope that a return to civilian rule would bring a reprieve. Turkey today is a deeply traumatised society. The purges and detentions are a lottery: one signatory of a petition calling for peace with the Kurds is purged from higher education, another remains precariously employed; someone is detained for getting a mortgage from a now expropriated bank, someone else who held an account with the same bank is unaffected. Turks today confront the capriciousness of arbitrary power with no recourse to anything that resembles the rule of law.

Sally Rooney: An Irish Problem "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

The abortion rate in Ireland will not fall if the referendum fails; it may not increase substantially if the referendum passes. But the relationship of pregnant women in Ireland to their own bodies will change, and change significantly, if the Yes campaign is successful. I was born in 1991, the same year a Virgin Megastore in Dublin was raided for selling condoms without a pharmacist present. Two years before the decriminalisation of homosexuality. Four years before the legalisation of divorce. Twenty-seven years, I can only hope, before the repeal of the Eighth Amendment.

Henry Siegman: An Autopsy "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

The two-state solution died because Netanyahu and successive Israeli governments were determined to kill it, and those who could have prevented its demise lacked the resolve and moral courage to do so. America failed in the mission it thought itself uniquely qualified to accomplish because it failed to understand that the diplomatic objective of a great power, and particularly the worlds greatest power, should not be peace, a goal that Netanyahu dishonestly embraced, but justice.

Tariq Ali: That was the year that was "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

The French May erupted as we were about to launch the first issue of Black Dwarf, which had come out looking slightly miserabilist and unimaginative. It was generally felt that the cover was awful. We voted to pulp it and D.A.N. Jones, later of the LRB, walked out. Wed lost the editor. I was asked to take over and with designer Robin Fior looking over my shoulder I wrote: WE SHALL FIGHT, WE WILL WIN: PARIS, LONDON, ROME, BERLIN. The vote was unanimous. We were for Utopia.

Letters "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

The letters page from London Review of Books Vol. 40 No. 10 (24 May 2018)

Table of contents "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Table of contents from London Review of Books Vol. 40 No. 10 (24 May 2018)

Friday, 18 May

04:11

Natural gas project that promised economic boom leaves PNG in worse state: report "IndyWatch Feed Allaunews"

In 2008, when a consortium led by ExxonMobil was drumming up support for a $19 billion natural gas extraction and processing project in Papua New Guinea, proponents of the development predicted it would underpin the countrys economy for decades. Production began in 2014, and now reaches approximately 7.9 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas per year. However, according to two recent reports by advocacy group Jubilee Australia Research Centre, the PNG LNG project has not only exacerbated conflict and inequality in the Papua New Guinea highlands, it has also failed to produce the promised benefits. According to Jubilee Australias analysis, PNGs economy would be better off if the gas had been left in the ground. Predicted economic impacts of the PNG LNG project compared to actual impacts (based on Jubilee Australias analysis of underlying economic trends). While exports have exceeded expectations, GDP growth has been slower than forecast and income, employment and government spending have dropped. Image courtesy of Jubilee Australia. Big promises When pitching the project, developers made big promises about the economic and social benefits the megaproject would bring to the country. One influential 2008 study, an economic impact analysis commissioned by ExxonMobil and authored by Australian consultants ACIL-Tasman (now ACIL-Allen), predicted the project would bring a tremendous windfall not only to shareholders, but also to the people of PNG. It forecast the overall size of the countrys economy would nearly double, household incomes would rise by 84 percent, and employment increase by 42 percent. Backers of the project

03:43

03:43

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Archiver

Go Back:30 Days | 7 Days | 2 Days | 1 Day

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

IndyWatch The Wire All Topics Summary was generated at The Wire IndyWatch.

Resource generated at IndyWatch using aliasfeed and rawdog