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Wednesday, 13 June

02:05

Flash floods hit Guadalajara, leaving some areas under 4 m (13 feet) of water, Mexico "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Heavy rain associated with Tropical Cyclone "Bud" hit Guadalajara, Mexico on June 10, 2018, producing severe flash floods in several parts of the city, including the light rain system where 40 people had to be rescued. As reported by Mexico News Daily,...... Read more

In a country long wary of nuclear, an Indonesian chases the thorium dream "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

JAKARTA In 2013, Bob Effendi was at a turning point. He wanted to leave the oil company he was working for. He had growing concerns about climate change and regretted the role his industry was playing in it. I had internal conflicts with my boss and my conscience, he recounts. Effendi, an engineer by training, quit and gave himself one year to study renewable energy. He attended seminars around the world, hoping to learn how to power a cleaner future with wind, solar, hydro and geothermal resources. Instead, he became a proponent of nuclear energy. But not just any nuclear energy. The ideas of a group of researchers spearheaded by a former NASA engineer named Kirk Sorensen had caught his attention. In the early 2000s, Sorensen had begun trying to revive interest in an alternative type of reactor, one that uses the element thorium instead of uranium to start the nuclear reaction, and liquid fuel instead of solid rods to sustain it. The technology was decades old, but never brought to commercial maturity. Sorensen came to believe it could make the next generation of nuclear power plants much safer and easier to manage, and provide the world with an abundance of clean, cheap and safe energy. To Effendi, it sounded too good to be true. But the more he studied the technology, he says, the more he became convinced it could solve the energy problems of his home country, Indonesia. The worlds fourth-most populous nation, home to some 260

Citigroup limits financing for mines that dump tailings at sea "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

Several mines around the world dispose of potentially toxic mine waste directly into the ocean. Environmentalists have criticized the practice, arguing that the waste smothers ocean habitat and leaches harmful chemicals and heavy metals that can poison marine life. Last month Citigroup, a major shareholder in four mining companies that either actively dispose of mine waste into the ocean or propose to do so, agreed not to finance any new operations that pipe mine waste into the sea. Citigroups move comes after pressure from an international coalition of NGOs that launched a campaign this year to end the disposal of mine waste in natural water bodies. The coalition, led by the Washington, D.C.-based environmental NGO Earthworks, is calling for a global ban on the practice and pressuring financial institutions to stop funding mining operations that engage in it. Earthworks announced Citigroups move in a May 2 press release. Citis decision says loud and clear: ocean dumping is dirty, unnecessary and wrong, Ellen Moore, who coordinates the Ditch Ocean Dumping campaign for Earthworks, told Mongabay. There are few signs of life on the bottom of Jssingfjord in southern Norway 35 years after dumping ceased at the Tellnes titanium mine. Scientists believe it may never recover. Image by Erling Svensen. Toxic tailings One of the key problems miners face is how to safely dispose of the huge quantities of waste rock and tailings produced in the mining process. The tailings, a fine-particle slurry left over after the target metal has been extracted

Putin and Xi top the G6+1 (Pepe Escobar ) "IndyWatch Feed Allworld"

12/06/2018 - All hell broke loose at the G6+1, aka G7, while the China-led Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) aimed at global integration and a peaceful multipolar order Summits in contrast, by Liu Rui/Global ...

01:40

Korean Firm Keypair Launches Credit Card-Shaped NFC Hardware Wallet "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Korean Firm Keypair Launches Credit Card Shaped NFC Hardware Wallet

A new hardware wallet has been launched by the South Korean financial tech firm Keypair. The companys Keywallet Touch has an interesting design as its shaped like a credit card and utilizes NFC technology. The company says the devices smart card chipset supports cryptocurrencies like bitcoin cash, ethereum, bitcoin core and litecoin, while also providing FIDO Universal 2nd Factor Authentication (U2F).

Also read: Bitcoin Cash Innovation Continues with the First On-Chain Atomic Bet

South Korean Firm Keypair Launches Keywallet Touch Hardware Wallet  

Theres been a slew of new cryptocurrency hardware wallets coming into the ecosystem and the South Korean company Keypair has launched a new model. This past March news.Bitcoin.com reported the firms previous design, the Keywallet Classic, and a few new hardware wallet manufacturers stemming from South Korea as demand for the devices has grown exponentially in that region. The Keywallet Classic debuted this January at the CES Electronics Show and the product has also been selling on Ebay. The companys latest device the Keywallet Touch is a hardware wallet shaped like a credit card, similar to the Coolwallet device...

01:38

loan amortization schedule excel with extra payments "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

loan amortization schedule excel with extra payments

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